FACT: Breast cancer is the #1 cause of death for women age 35-50.
FACT: 40,000 American women still die from breast cancer every year.

Despite so many advances in medicine, the number of women still dying each year from breast cancer is overwhelming, and in many cases unnecessary– if only women had the information they needed to protect themselves. As a doctor specializing in the early detection of breast cancer, and as a mom and a girlfriend, I’ve created this website and blog to serve as a professional yet personal resource for women who are motivated to learn more about breast cancer in order to do whatever they can to save themselves from this disease. I’ve seen the women who live and the women who don’t, and it’s time for me to share what I’ve learned.

Welcome to staceyvitiellomd.com, and my blog, The Breast Diaries. Read the offerings, join the conversation, and pass it along to the women you love! I hope you find it useful.

 

New Video From Montclair Breast Center

Patients speak on the benefits of personalized, humanized breast care.  Short video here: http://www.montclairbreastcenter.com/

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Montclair Breast Center Responds to Mammogram Controversy

Montclair Breast Center Responds to Mammogram Controversy

The physicians at Montclair Breast Center are extremely disappointed by the NY Times’ recent decision to run a front page article that cites an incredibly flawed study from the British Medical Journal as if it is actually legitimate science. The BMJ article is based on the deeply flawed and widely discredited Canadian National Breast Screening Study, which used a fundamentally corrupted allocation process for the two patient groups that were compared; it was also based on mammograms from the 1980’s that were of incredibly poor quality, even by the standards…

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Q & A: Does it matter who the radiologist is that reads my mammogram or other breast imaging studies? Why?

By Stacey Vitiello, MD

  •    It matters who reads your mammogram. If your study is read by a radiology doctor (radiologist) who practices general radiology or another radiology subspecialty and only reads a few mammograms per week, you are probably not receiving the best care. Yes, the guy is board certified and is licensed by law to read your mammogram. But I am licensed to read all radiology studies as well, even though my specialty is breast imaging. Doesn’t mean I should muddle through interpreting the next brain or shoulder MRI that comes my way.

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Q & A: How do I find a “good” breast imaging center? Does it make a difference where I go?

Q & A:  How do I find a “good” breast imaging center?  Does it make a difference where I go?

By Stacey Vitiello, MD

  •    Yes, it matters where you choose to go for your mammogram! The most basic requirement is whether a facility is accredited under the MQSA (Mammography Quality Standards Act). The accrediting body for most states is the ACR (American College of Radiology), which has a list of requirements and tests that facilities must comply with in order for the centers to achieve accreditation. They look at things such as equipment and film quality, radiation dose, credentials of the mammography technologists and of the radiology doctors

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Q & A: What if I feel a lump and the mammogram and ultrasound are negative (normal)?

By Stacey Vitiello, MD

  •    Never ignore a lump. When you feel a lump and mammogram and ultrasound (also known as a sonogram) are negative, there is still a 2-3 % chance that the lump is cancer. Have your doctor refer you to a breast surgeon. They might want to perform a needle biopsy in the office based on what they feel, or they may advise surgical removal of the lump in the operating room. If the doctor doesn’t test the lump, and you still feel it, seek a second opinion from another surgeon. You know your body better than anyone.

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